In a 1992 campaign speech, Democratic presidential nominee and Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton proposes deploying one hundred thousand more police officers to American streets, public schools, and public housing developments.

In a 1992 campaign speech, Democratic presidential nominee and Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton speaks of his proposals for crime prevention. Addressing a national audience, Clinton calls out the New York City Police Department’s embrace of community policing, suggesting that it might serve as a model for a nation-wide effort. Standing in front of a poster that read “Clinton/Gore ’92: For A Safer America” in a hall in Romulus, Michigan, Clinton would proceed to receive the endorsement of the American Association of Attorneys General.

Core to Clinton’s strategy is deploying one hundred thousand more police officers to the street by civilianizing the police force, by creating career opportunities for veterans of the armed services in local law enforcement, and by creating a college loan forgiveness program for police officers working at reduced pay. Spatially, Clinton calls out public schools and public housing as places where this enlarged police presence will be especially felt, and where it will be supplemented both by technology such as metal detectors and by organizing with groups like citizens’ task forces, tenant management projects, and school mentorship programs.

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Buell Center (sz2950)