"On The Issues—Issues Are Not A Matter of Debate"
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This interview with the three leading candidates for New York City mayor reveals a uniformly pro-police field of candidates borrowing assertions from Kelling and Wilson’s Broken Windows theory of policing.

An interview by New York Newsday with the three leading candidates for New York City mayor reveals a uniformly pro-police field of candidates in the 1993 election. Rudy Giuliani, the self-described Republican-Liberal candidate and eventual mayor, describes his strategies as taking police officers out of courts and offices and onto the streets, expanding street arrests for drugs, and increasing penalties for minor infractions including littering, vandalism, and panhandling. Giuliani’s opponent, sitting mayor and Democratic candidate David Dinkins, describes his plans to hire 1,200 new police officers to be deployed in New York City schools and to crack down on dance clubs and vandalism. The Conservative party candidate George Marlin describes his plan to increase the visibility of police on the streets, increase the power of street cops to make arrests, and make the punishment of vandalism a top priority.

Echoes of these pro-police positions are heard in many subsequent mayoral elections. The legacy of Kelling and Wilson’s “Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety.” is clearly felt, with candidates agreeing across party lines to crack down on minor legal infractions.

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Buell Center (sz2950)