“The Year Of Change: Reengineering The New York City Police Department”
NYPD

“The Year Of Change: Reengineering The New York City Police Department” details new tactics employed by the New York City Police Department under Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Commissioner William Bratton intended to give the police a more active role in punishing “small crime.”

The New York City Police Department’s (NYPD) 1995 “agenda” details new measures implemented under Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Commissioner William Bratton to reduce “crime, disorder, and fear throughout the city.” The department assesses its performance exclusively through crime statistics, citing incrementally decreasing figures from 1991 through 1993 as evidence of the department’s not “living up to its full potential.” The document accordingly justifies this need to “reengineer” the NYPD through repeated comparison to private companies, viewing crime prevention as an optimizable operation, like any good or service. The dehumanized, techno-managerial nature of these reforms’ description is further indicated by the description of squeegee people as “pests.”

This crackdown was largely influenced by the Broken Windows theory of policing, which holds that such infractions are inextricably linked to fear and more serious crime. The document specifically highlights five new crime control strategies (with three more following later in the year), three of which are documented in detail for in this archive because of their explicitly spatial implications: “NYPD Strategy No. 2: Curbing Youth Violence in the Schools and on the Streets,” “NYPD Strategy No. 3: Driving Drug Dealers Out of New York City,” and “NYPD Strategy No. 5: Reclaiming the Public Spaces of New York City.”

Entry Author
Buell Center (aes2344)